Courses for West Campus Residents

Fall 2019 LWYL Courses for West Campus Residents

The Pursuit of Excellence and Well-Being (Simultaneously!)

This course will consist of a brief overview of the field of Positive Psychology and an introduction to positive interventions to enhance well-being. You will become familiar with evidence based positive interventions, their benefits, and how to integrate them in your life.

West Campus. Fall (CRP 3899-103) 1 credit, Mondays, 4:30–5:30pm, Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Amanda Carreiro, Becker House Assistant Dean; and Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean. Priority given to Becker residents.


Cook Community Engagement: Bridging Self, Community, and World

This interdisciplinary course serves as a gateway for engagement in the Alice Cook House community. As such, one of the primary purposes of the class is to introduce and expose you to the varied opportunities for engagement using speakers from the Cornell, Ithaca, and global communities and also across social, environmental, and natural sciences, engineering, arts, and humanities. Spaces (both physical and digital) will be provided for students to engage in informal discussions with Cornell faculty members, other invited speakers, and each other. The goal is to provide a platform for critical thinking and reflection within and beyond the boundaries of one’s own discipline(s).

West Campus. Fall (NTRES 4940-Lec 001) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7–8pm, House Professor-Dean apartment. Taught by Shorna Allred, Natural Resources and Alice Cook House Professor-Dean. This course is targeted at residents of Alice Cook House (including the Language House) on West Campus but is open to anyone.


Social Media: Theory and Practice

From marketing, to sharing our life experiences, to getting the news, social media permeates our lives. In the process, it raises important challenges regarding the self, corporate responsibility, and privacy. In this course we will investigate these questions through practical and theoretical approaches. First, we will run the various social media accounts of Carl Becker House on West Campus. Second, we will read philosophical and sociological work on the moral and social issues raised by social media. Finally, we will hear from speakers on both the practical aspects (e.g., how to be a social media influencer) and the theoretical (what is privacy?).

West Campus. Fall (CRP 3899-104PHIL 1902) 1 credit, Mondays, 7:30-8:20pm, Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Augie Faller, PhD student in Philosophy and Becker House Graduate Resident Fellow; and Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean. Priority given to Becker residents.


Carl Becker Café

The café series is a weekly informal discussion held every Wednesday evening. The café features guest speakers who share their experience and expertise and often speak to challenging issues of our time. Our guests are eloquent, committed people leading very interesting lives. Hosted in the Becker House Professor’s apartment, at café you’ll enjoy great conversation in a relaxed environment with coffee and treats provided! You may join the café on a drop-in basis or take it as a 1-credit S/U course. 

West Campus. Fall (CRP 3899-101) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, Carl Becker House Professor-Dean apartment. Hosted by Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean; and Becker House Graduate Resident Fellows. Priority given to Becker residents.


Cornell University Becker in Service (CUBS)

CUBS is a community service initiative at Becker House. Members of CUBS have helped local food pantries, worked with seniors in assisted-care facilities, organized food drives, raised funds for cancer research, maintained the flower beds around Becker House, and done many other acts of goodwill. You may join CUBS on a drop-in basis or take it as a 1-credit S/U course. 

West Campus. Fall (CRP 3899-102) 1 credit, day and time TBD, Carl Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean; and Becker House Graduate Resident Fellows. Priority given to Becker residents.


Bethe Ansatz: What Makes a Fulfilled Life?

On a weekly basis, Bethe Ansatz will bring together students, Cornell faculty members, and other distinguished guests for informal, substantive engagement around a wide range of issues and endeavors: intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political. The conversational format, which encourages discussion and interaction, allows you to discover the intrinsic interest and reward of a life characterized by broad, vital intellectual curiosity and engagement. 

West Campus. Fall (AS 1200) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, Hans Bethe House Professor-Dean apartment. Hosted by Andrew Hicks, Music and Medieval Studies and Hans Bethe House Professor-Dean.


Spring 2020 LWYL courses for West Campus Residents

Foundations for Healthy Living

This course is designed to expose students to the latest research and practice in areas foundational for health and well-being throughout life. In each of the seven weeks of the course, the instructor will coordinate bringing in experts from the Cornell and Ithaca College communities to share research and best practices in seven foundational areas: sleep and biological health; exercise and physical health; nutrition and eating habits; mental rest and relaxation; sexual health and healthy relationships; medical practices for health and preventive care; and financial literacy, health and well-being.

West Campus. Spring (PAM 1300) 1 credit, Tuesdays 5:30–7pm, March 10 through April 28, Flora Rose House Professor-Dean apartment. Taught by Rosemary Avery, Policy, Analysis, and Management, and Flora Rose House Professor-Dean.


Leadership and Service in Tompkins County 

This service-learning course examines issues in Ithaca and surrounding areas and explores innovative approaches being used to bring about social equity and justice in relation to food access, immigration rights, financial inequality, animal activism, and education, among many others. We will hear from and work with community stakeholders to see exactly what it is they do and how we can get involved. In fact, we will be conducting community service trips in and around the Ithaca area.  

West Campus. Spring (ENG #TBD) 1 credit, date and time TBD, Keeton House Seminar Room. Taught by Ama Bemma Adwetewa-Badu, Keeton House Graduate Resident Fellow; and Jon McKenzie, English.


Environmental Justice 

This course explores social justice in the environmental context culminating in a spring break service-learning trip to central Alabama to learn the civil rights legacy of our country and how that is related to life of people of color in the United States today.  The course will engage students in the theory and practice of environmental justice with a particular focus on inequality.  Students should have a strong interest in working collaboratively with environmentally overburdened communities — often communities of color and low-income communities.  The spring break trip will include a trip to the Legacy Museum:  From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration as well as learning from and working with community members on environmental justice issues.  Students will learn and practice critical reflection as an essential component of this experience.  This course is offered in collaboration with the West Campus House System, the Public Service Center, and the Departments of Natural Resources and Government and local organizations.  The spring break trip is mandatory for students enrolled in the course.  Trip costs will be subsidized for students with financial need.  All students are encouraged to enroll but preference will be given to students living in the West Campus House System. 

West Campus. Spring (NTRES 4940) 2 credits, first seven weeks of semester, Wednesdays, 7:30–8:20pm, 106 Alice Cook House plus a spring break service-trip (March 28–April 5). Taught by Shorna Allred, Natural Resources and Alice Cook House Professor-Dean; and Jamila Michener, Government. All students encouraged to enroll; preference given to students living in the West Campus House System.


Carl Becker Café

The café series is a weekly informal discussion held every Wednesday evening. The café features guest speakers who share their experience and expertise and often speak to challenging issues of our time. Our guests are eloquent, committed people leading very interesting lives. Hosted in the Becker House Professor’s apartment, at café you’ll enjoy great conversation in a relaxed environment with coffee and treats provided! You may join the café on a drop-in basis or take it as a 1-credit S/U course.

West Campus. Spring (CRP 3899-101) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, Carl Becker House Professor-Dean apartment. Hosted by Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean; and Becker House Graduate Resident Fellows. Priority given to Becker residents.


Cornell University Becker in Service (CUBS)

CUBS is a community service initiative at Becker House. Members of CUBS have helped local food pantries, worked with seniors in assisted-care facilities, organized food drives, raised funds for cancer research, maintained the flower beds around Becker House, and done many other acts of goodwill. You may join CUBS on a drop-in basis or take it as a 1-credit S/U course. 

West Campus. Spring (CRP 3899-102) 1 credit, day and time TBD, Carl Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor-Dean; and Becker House Graduate Resident Fellows. Priority given to Becker residents.


Bethe Ansatz: What Makes a Fulfilled Life? 

On a weekly basis, Bethe Ansatz will bring together students, Cornell faculty members, and other distinguished guests for informal, substantive engagement around a wide range of issues and endeavors: intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political. The conversational format, which encourages discussion and interaction, allows you to discover the intrinsic interest and reward of a life characterized by broad, vital intellectual curiosity and engagement. 

West Campus. Spring (AS 1200) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, Hans Bethe House Professor-Dean apartment. Hosted by Andrew Hicks, Music and Medieval Studies and Hans Bethe House Professor-Dean.