Courses for West Campus Residents

Fall 2017 LWYL courses for West Campus Residents

Bethe Ansatz: Building a Life Worth Living Once a week Bethe Ansatz will bring together students, Cornell faculty, and other distinguished guests for informal discussion of intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political issues and endeavors. The conversational format, which encourages discussion and interaction, will allow students to discover the intrinsic interest and reward of a life characterized by broad, vital intellectual curiosity and engagement.

West Campus. Fall and Spring (AS 1200) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, House Professor and Dean apartment (125 Hans Bethe House). Hosted by Julia Thom-Levy, Physics and Hans Bethe Professor and Dean.


Cook Community Engagement: Bridging Self, Community, and World This interdisciplinary course serves as a gateway for engagement in the Alice Cook House community. As such, one of the primary purposes of the class is to introduce and expose students to the varied opportunities for engagement using speakers from the Cornell, Ithaca, and global communities and also across social, environmental, and natural sciences, engineering, arts, and humanities. Spaces (both physical and digital) will be provided for students to engage in informal discussions with Cornell faculty members, other invited speakers, and each other. The goal is to provide a platform for critical thinking and reflection within and beyond the boundaries of one’s own discipline(s). Students will interact with peers, faculty, guest speakers, and Cook House community members who will provide first-hand perspectives on their work. The course is targeted at residents of Alice Cook House (including the Language House) on West Campus but is open to anyone on campus.

West Campus. Fall (NTRES 4940-Lec 002) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7–8pm, House Professor and Dean apartment (101 Alice Cook House). Taught by Shorna Allred, Natural Resources and Alice Cook House Professor and Dean.


Listening Where You Live: An Oral History of Belonging and Community Oral history is human experience at its most elemental: one person listening to another speak about their experience of events large and small. Through oral history, we document discrete stories about individual lives, each of unique value. We also gain a sense of broader patterns and practices, how communities form, and how people become part of and change their communities. Students will practice oral history with area community members who arrived here as immigrants or refugees and with fellow Cornell students, considering how a sense of belonging emerges, or remains elusive, as people join new communities. Topics will include how community structures and practices, formal and informal, impact belonging and the expression of identities, and how stories bring big data and complex structures back to a human scale.

West Campus. Fall (CRP 3855) 1 credit, Thursdays, 4:10–5:30pm, Carl Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Peggy Arcadi, Director of New Student Programs; and Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor and Dean. Limited to 20 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.


North and West Campus Dialogue on Race Like many elite universities in the United States, Cornell prides itself on the diversity of its student population. Yet many students remark how race influences the way Cornellians make friends, socialize, and affiliate on campus. In this interactive course based on facilitated dialogue, students will use their own histories and lived experiences to learn from and with each other as they examine intersecting issues of race and other aspects of identity, privilege, and oppression dynamics in an atmosphere of honesty, mutual engagement, and respect.

West Campus. Fall (ENGL 1605) 2 credits, Tuesdays, 6:00–8:00pm, Alice Cook House Seminar Room. Taught by Shirley Samuels, English and Flora Rose House Fellow; and Jen Majka, Alice Cook House Assistant Dean. Limited to 20 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.


Spring 2018 LWYL courses for West Campus Residents

Bethe Ansatz: Building a Life Worth Living Once a week Bethe Ansatz will bring together students, Cornell faculty, and other distinguished guests for informal discussion of intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political issues and endeavors. The conversational format, which encourages discussion and interaction, will allow students to discover the intrinsic interest and reward of a life characterized by broad, vital intellectual curiosity and engagement.

West Campus. Fall and Spring (AS 1200) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:15–8:15pm, House Professor and Dean apartment (125 Hans Bethe House). Hosted by Julia Thom-Levy, Physics and Hans Bethe Professor and Dean.


Confinement When we think about prisons and jails, we tend to think mostly about crime—or maybe social inequality. But we rarely think about how it feels to be locked up and what social life in prisons and jails is like. This course will address these questions through a series of films, guest lectures, and maybe a visit to a prison or jail.

West Campus. Spring (PAM 2080) 1 credit, Mondays, January 29, February 5, 12, 26, March 5 and 12, 3:00–4:30pm, Keeton House Seminar Room. Taught by Christopher Wildeman, Policy Analysis, and Management and Court Kay Bauer Faculty Fellow. Limited to 15 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus. Permission of instructor required; contact Professor Wildeman and Angela Downing.


Culinary Encounters of the "Other" Kind: Americans Encountering Race, Culture, and Community through Food This course will explore both the joyful and the dark sides of eating and trace how food and cooking inform the various ways in which we ingest the world, specifically “racial and cultural otherness.” Topics will include how the meeting of food, word, image, and community engagement inform large social categories such as the nation, gender, race, family, and class. The first half of the course will consist of group discussions and tastings. The second half will be primarily hands-on food preparation leading up to a community dinner.

West Campus. Spring (AMST 1160) 2 credits, Mondays, 5:00–7:00pm, Alice Cook House Seminar Room. Taught by Shirley Samuels, English and Flora Rose House Fellow; Shadé Ayorinde, PhD student in Art History and Visual Studies and Cook House Graduate Resident Fellow; and Brianna Thompson, PhD student in English and Cook House Graduate Resident Fellow. Limited to 20 people; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.