Courses for North Campus Residents

Fall 2017 LWYL courses for North Campus Residents

Fascinating Figures This course will bring together students, faculty members, and guests for informal substantive discussion of intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political endeavors. Meetings, held in the North Campus faculty residences of the instructors, will feature a guest who is typically an accomplished scholar, artist, or public figure. Guests will speak informally about their work, careers, or special interests in a format designed to encourage interaction and discussion.

North Campus. Fall (ENGRG 1305) 1 credit, Mondays, 7:30–8:30pm, North Campus Faculty-in-Residence living rooms. Taught by Kit Umbach, Materials Science and Engineering and Dickson/McLLU Faculty-in-Residence; Chris Schaffer, Biomedical Engineering and Donlon Faculty-in-Residence; and Susan Daniel, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Balch Faculty-in-Residence. Limited to 20 students; students sophomore or above require permission of instructor; contact Professor Umbach at ccu1@cornell.edu


Listening Where You Live: An Oral History of Belonging and Community Oral history is human experience at its most elemental: one person listening to another speak about their experience of events large and small. Through oral history, we document discrete stories about individual lives, each of unique value. We also gain a sense of broader patterns and practices, how communities form, and how people become part of and change their communities. Students will practice oral history with area community members who arrived here as immigrants or refugees and with fellow Cornell students, considering how a sense of belonging emerges, or remains elusive, as people join new communities. Topics will include how community structures and practices, formal and informal, impact belonging and the expression of identities, and how stories bring big data and complex structures back to a human scale.

North Campus. Fall (CRP 3855) 1 credit, Thursdays, 4:10–5:30pm, Carl Becker House Seminar Room. Taught by Peggy Arcadi, Director of New Student Programs; and Neema Kudva, City and Regional Planning and Carl Becker House Professor and Dean. Limited to 20 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.


North and West Campus Dialogue on Race Like many elite universities in the United States, Cornell prides itself on the diversity of its student population. Yet many students remark how race influences the way Cornellians make friends, socialize, and affiliate on campus. In this interactive course based on facilitated dialogue, students will use their own histories and lived experiences to learn from and with each other as they examine intersecting issues of race and other aspects of identity, privilege, and oppression dynamics in an atmosphere of honesty, mutual engagement, and respect.

North Campus. Fall (ENGL 1605) 2 credits, Tuesdays, 6:00–8:00pm, Alice Cook House Seminar Room. Taught by Shirley Samuels, English and Flora Rose House Fellow; and Jen Majka, Alice Cook House Assistant Dean. Limited to 20 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.


Optimizing the Cornell Experience This course will help students make the most of their Cornell experience while promoting the skills to navigate a large university. It will introduce them to campus-based resources and opportunities for leadership while encouraging active citizenship and help-seeking behaviors. The course will combine facilitated discussions, out of class experiences, and guest presentations. 

North Campus. Fall (DSOC TBD) 1 credit, Mondays, 7:30–8:30pm. Taught by Lori Leonard, Development Sociology and Mews Faculty-in-Residence; and Jeannine Hagadorn, Mews Residence Hall Director. Limited to 15 students.


Take It Outside! Cornell University is often cited as one of America’s most beautiful campuses and with good reason—it hosts a botanic garden, an arboretum, two gorges, a landscape peppered with pocket gardens, gorgeous vistas, and many opportunities to Take It Outside! Students taking this course will visit a new part of the campus landscape each week to learn  about its history; what makes it unique; and how looking at nature, being in nature, and interacting with nature can improve learning and relieve stress.

North Campus. Fall (PLHRT 4940) 1 credit, Tuesdays, 2:30–4:25pm. Classes will typically leave from the Nevin Welcome Center of Cornell Botanic Gardens. Taught by Sonja Skelly, Cornell Botanic Gardens and Horticulture. Limited to 12 students; preference given to first-year students.


Wonder Women Students, faculty members, and invited guests will discuss the art of leadership and how women in leadership roles have managed the opportunities and challenges they have encountered. The sessions, held in the instructors’ North Campus faculty-in-residence apartments, will feature prominent women from different professions and walks of life. Potential speakers include politicians, artists, writers, scientists, women in spiritual life, and business owners and entrepreneurs. Speakers will share their stories in an informal way, opening up faculty-facilitated discussions about gender, leadership, accomplishment, work-life balance, and mentorship. These talks may be interspersed with or complemented by reading and discussing parts of recent books about women and leadership.

North Campus. Fall (DSOC 1120) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:30–8:30pm. Taught by Susan Daniel, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Balch Faculty-in-Residence; Lori Leonard, Development Sociology and Mews Faculty-in-Residence; and Noliwe Rooks, Africana Studies and Townhouses Faculty-in-Residence. Limited to 15 students.


Spring 2018 LWYL courses for North Campus Residents

Building Autopsy: Sustainability in Building Energy Policy from an Engineering–Economic–Behavioral Approach In this hands-on course students will go “behind the walls” to understand why some buildings use less energy than others. Retrofitting America’s buildings is key to U.S. sustainability, but efforts are stalled and this course will explain why. Students will visit buildings and “dissect” them to understand how buildings work, investigate how government policies affect retrofits, and talk to homeowners to see what they are really thinking.

North Campus. Spring (CEE 1010) 1 credit, Mondays, 5:30–6:30pm, Tatkon Center, room 3331, with two weekend field trips for site visits. Taught by Howard Chong, Economics and Sustainability and Faculty Fellow at Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and Donlon Faculty Fellow. Limited to 20 students.


Confinement When we think about prisons and jails, we tend to think mostly about crime—or maybe social inequality. But we rarely think about how it feels to be locked up and what social life in prisons and jails is like. This course will address these questions through a series of films, guest lectures, and maybe a visit to a prison or jail.

North Campus. Spring (PAM 2080) 1 credit, Mondays, January 29, February 5, 12, 26, March 5 and 12, 3:00–4:30pm, Keeton House Seminar Room. Taught by Christopher Wildeman, Policy Analysis, and Management and Court Kay Bauer Faculty Fellow. Limited to 15 students; priority given to residents of North and West Campus. Permission of instructor required; contact Professor Wildeman and Angela Downing.


Culinary Encounters of the "Other" Kind: Americans Encountering Race, Culture, and Community through Food This course will explore both the joyful and the dark sides of eating and trace how food and cooking inform the various ways in which we ingest the world, specifically “racial and cultural otherness.” Topics will include how the meeting of food, word, image, and community engagement inform large social categories such as the nation, gender, race, family, and class. The first half of the course will consist of group discussions and tastings. The second half will be primarily hands-on food preparation leading up to a community dinner.

North Campus. Spring (AMST 1160) 2 credits, Mondays, 5:00–7:00pm, Alice Cook House Seminar Room. Taught by Shirley Samuels, English and Flora Rose House Fellow; Shadé Ayorinde, PhD student in Art History and Visual Studies and Cook House Graduate Resident Fellow; and Brianna Thompson, PhD student in English and Cook House Graduate Resident Fellow. Limited to 20 people; priority given to residents of North and West Campus.


Fascinating Figures This course will bring together students, faculty members, and guests for informal substantive discussion of intellectual, cultural, artistic, scientific, moral, social, and political endeavors. Meetings, held in the North Campus faculty residences of the instructors, will feature a guest who is typically an accomplished scholar, artist, or public figure. Guests will speak informally about their work, careers, or special interests in a format designed to encourage interaction and discussion.

North Campus. Spring (ENGRG 1305) 1 credit, Mondays, 7:30–8:30pm, North Campus Faculty-in-Residence living rooms. Taught by Kit Umbach, Materials Science and Engineering and Dickson/McLLU Faculty-in-Residence; Chris Schaffer, Biomedical Engineering and Donlon Faculty-in-Residence; and Susan Daniel, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Balch Faculty-in-Residence. Limited to 20 students; students sophomore or above require permission of instructor; contact Professor Umbach.


Hidden Voices in Science Everyone knows Darwin, Newton, and Einstein, but what about Percy Julian, Barbara McClintock, and Carlos Finlay? This course will expose first-year students to female and minority scientists who made significant contributions to their fields but are largely unknown. Students will spend each class period researching and discussing the life history of a female or minority scientist, and participate in a discussion of the science they accomplished and the times in which they lived. No science background required. Limited to 20 students; preference given to first-year students.

North Campus. Spring (VETMI 1150) 1 credit, Mondays, 7:00–7:50pm, Tatkon Center, room 3331. Taught by Avery August, Microbiology and Immunology and Donlon Faculty Fellow. Limited to 20 students; first-year students only.


Hit or Miss: Understanding the Television Drama Ever wonder what goes on behind the development and production of a TV series? Students will join Communication professor Sahara Byrne to watch a new series and discuss how a TV drama is developed from the seed of an idea. They will learn why a pilot is selected for a series, how a show is produced, and what marketing and publicity is required to launch a new TV show. The class will include call-in guest speakers who are directly involved with the show. Assignments will include short papers, written reactions, social media marketing tasks, and a final assessment of the show.

North Campus. Spring (COMM 1940) 1.5 credits, day and time dependent on television scheduling. Taught by Sahara Byrne, Communication. Permission of instructor required; priority given to first-year students with half the seats available for first-year Communication students. Contact Professor Byrne. Letter graded.


It’s the Small Things That Rule the World—Viruses Infect Everything Viruses are the most abundant living things in our biosphere. This course will introduce students to the enormity and diversity of the viral world, the important roles that viruses have played in history and in our lives today, and amazing things that humans can do with viruses.

North Campus. Spring (VETMI 1100) 1 credit, Mondays, 4:30–5:20pm, Tatkon Center, room 3331. Taught by John Parker, Virology and Donlon Faculty Fellow. Limited to 20 students; first-year students only.


Seeing Science in Action Too often science is taught as a collection of static facts in a book, whereas science professionals think of science as a creative and collaborative process for discovery. In this course, students will learn about and see cutting-edge research in modern laboratories through a program that first brings three different Cornell faculty members to talk about their research, followed by the class spending a day shadowing Ph.D. students and post-docs in each faculty member’s lab, and concluding with the class reading a journal paper from each lab. The class will also include discussion of careers in scientific research and the public policies that support and benefit from science.

North Campus. Spring (BME 1110) 1 credit, Wednesdays, 7:30–9:00pm, Donlon Faculty-in-Residence apartment. Taught by Chris Schaffer, Biomedical Engineering and Donlon Faculty-in-Residence. Limited to 12 students.